Technology News - Android Studio 1.3 now supports C/C++ NDK
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Hello Folks, do you code in either of the languages – C/C++. Then here is good news for you. Google has recently released Android Studio having support for C/C++ NDK.
Read in order to explore.

What Is Android Studio?

Android Studio is an Integrated Development Environment for developing Android based applications based upon IntelliJIDEA (A JAVA IDE).
It was announced on May 16, 2013 at the Google I/O conference by Google’s Product Manager, Katherine Chou.
Recently Google released the Android Studio 1.3, a new version of the IDE with built-in support for the C/C++ NDK which is based upon JetBrains CLion (https://www.jetbrains.com/clion/) platform.
Moreover, it is available for free to all the Android developers, says the official sources.

Difference between NDK and SDK?

NDK

It stands for native development kit.
The NDK is a toolbox that allows you to implement parts of your application using native-code languages such as C and C++.
the NDK allows C and C++ code to coexist with Java code.

SDK

It stands for software Development Kit.
In this Software Development Kit, applications are written using “JAVA”.
The Android SDK includes the following stuffs:-
Required libraries
Debugger
An emulator.
documentation for the Android application program interfaces (API(application programming interface- a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications)).
Sample source code.
Tutorials.

Footnote:Every single time, whenever Google releases a new version of Android, a corresponding SDK is also released. In order to write application with the latest features, developers must download and install each version’s SDK.

NDK Versus SDK, Which one to prefer?

As we all know that Java is a well equipped language in terms of Android application codes and in SDK application codes are written using JAVA so, one should prefer writing android application codes using SDK while good usability cases for the NDK are CPU-intensive applications such as game engines, signal processing, and physics simulation.
Here is what Developer.android.com(http://developer.android.com/tools/sdk/ndk/index.html) has to say about the Android Studio C/C++ NDK:

 Before downloading the NDK, you should understand that the NDK will not benefit most apps. As a developer, you need to balance its benefits against its drawbacks. Notably, using native code on Android generally does not result in a noticeable performance improvement, but it always increases your app complexity. In general, you should only use the NDK if it is essential to your app —never because you simply prefer to program in C/C++. When examining whether or not you should develop in native code, think about your requirements and see if the Android framework APIs provide the functionality that you need.

Final Words

Android is one of the best platforms to use, build and explore. With the release of Android Studio 1.3 with C/C++ NDK support we can now expect some cool and exciting android applications and features by the native coders.Android Studio 1.3 with C/C++ NDK support equips all the native coders to develop something exciting and to showcase their talent in the android world.

You can be the one. Just keep calm and code.

Over to you now. Just leave your valuable feedback if you think that The Introduction of Android Studio 1.3 with C/C++ NDK support will prove to be a boon for the android community.

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